Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Self-management of dementia by family carers: A hybrid concept analysis

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Conference Abstracts

Self-management of dementia by family carers: A hybrid concept analysis

Author:

Sharyn Hunter

University Of Newcastle, AU
X close

Abstract

Introduction: 

Self-management of dementia includes family carers [1, 2]. However, the concept of self-management of dementia by family carers is not well understood [1, 2]. An understanding of self-management of dementia by carers is needed to develop and deliver interventions to support them in this role.

Methods:

A hybrid concept analysis using the Schwartz-Barcott & Kim's (2000) approach was conducted [3]. The three phases of this approach were undertaken as follows. Phase 1, the theoretical phase, comprehensively explored the literature to develop a working definition of self-management of dementia by family carers. Phase 2, the fieldwork phase, a qualitative study was conducted where in-depth individual interviews were undertaken with seven family carers and five expert health providers. Phase 3, data were extracted from Phases 1 and 2 to yield the attributes of self-management of dementia by carers.

Results:

Overall, the results from the Theoretical and Fieldwork phases were similar and complemented each other. The interviews validated and enriched the descriptions that were found in the literature. However, there were several differences noted between the two data sources. Firstly, several attributes were not described in the literature. Also the interviews provided extensive description of the carer being involved in caring for themselves as part of self-management of dementia by the carers. The interviews also revealed gender differences between the carers that were not evident in the literature.

Discussion:

Twelve attributes emerged in four major domains from the analysis for the concept of self-management of dementia by carers. The domains included: (1) managing the impact of dementia on care recipients (caregiving); (2) managing the impact of dementia on carers (self-care); (3) managing the relationship between carers and their care recipients (taking care of the relationship); and (4) skills and personal characteristics.

Conclusion:

This presentation provides a description of the concept of self-management of dementia by family carers. The findings can assist in the designing and evaluating self-management support interventions for family carers.

Limitations:

The sample size of family carers and health providers was limited because of size and diversity.

Lessons Learned:

A Hybrid Concept Analysis assists with concept clarification.

Suggestions for future research:

These findings can be used to inform future research about the development of a conceptual framework of self-management of dementia by family carers.

References

1. Spenceley SM, Sedgwick N, Keenan J. Dementia care in the context of primary care reform: an integrative review. Aging Ment Health[Internet].  2015; 19(2): 107-120. URL DOI:10.1080/13607863.2014.920301

2. Huis In Het Veld J, Verkaik R, Mistiaen P, van Meijel B, Francke A. The effectiveness of interventions in supporting self-management of informal caregivers of people with dementia: a systematic meta review. BMC Geriatric [Internet].  2015; 15, 147. URL DOI:10.1186/s12877-015-0145-6

3. Schwartz-Barcott D, Kim HS. An expansion and elaboration of the hybrid model of concept development. In: Rodgers BL, Knafl KA, editors. Concept development in nursing. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunder; 2000. p. 129-160.

How to Cite: Hunter S. Self-management of dementia by family carers: A hybrid concept analysis. International Journal of Integrated Care. 2021;21(S1):92. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/ijic.ICIC20260
30
Views
12
Downloads
Published on 01 Sep 2021.

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)